The Addiction Severity Index

Why Did We Create The Danger Scale?


Currently, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies drugs into five distinct schedules depending on a drug’s acceptable medical use and potential for dependency. Schedule I drugs represent the highest potential for abuse; Schedule V drugs the least potential.

However, this government classification system is only part of the picture. The drug danger scale is designed to help clarify the true danger of popular American drugs, serving as a true addiction severity index that you can reference.

A Transparent Look at The Overall Impact of a Drug

For example, marijuana is a Class I drug, and consequently it is considered “more dangerous” than cocaine or crystal meth, which are both Class II drugs. In reality, the potential to become addicted to cocaine and crystal meth – and the damage these drugs can do – is far greater than marijuana.

Our drug danger scale helps you sort through the information and find the drugs with the biggest societal impact, most dangerous consequences, and highest potential for addiction. Learn more by browsing the drug pages in our addiction severity index.

 


The Addiction Severity Index

Street Drugs

Click the drug name to learn more about that substance.

 


Ecstacy/MDMA
Level 4 - Moderate Danger


Inhalants
Level 3 - Low Danger


Marijuana
Level 2 - Low Danger


Psilocybin
Level 2 - Low Danger

Prescriptions

Click the drug name to learn more about that substance.

 


Ambien
Level 2 - Low Danger


Oxycontin
Level 4 - Moderate Danger


Tramadol/Ultram
Level 4 - Moderate Danger


Vicodin
Level 4 - Moderate Danger


Xanax
Xanax Danger Scale

Depressants

Click the drug name to learn more about that substance.

 


Alcohol
Level 5 - Extreme Danger


Heroin
Level 5 - Extreme Danger

Stimulants

Click the drug name to learn more about that substance.

 


Adderall
Level 2 - Low Danger


Crack/Cocaine
Level 4 - Moderate Danger


Crystal Methamphetamine
Level 5 - Extreme Danger

The drug danger scale and addiction severity index takes into account the Drug Enforcement Administration’s rating system, while also reflecting the drug’s potential for addiction, its recreational value, its societal impact, and the drug’s long-term effects on a user’s body. This rating system gives a fuller picture of drug abuse in America, including the most commonly abused and most dangerous drugs.